Tag Archives: cyclops

Comic Book Noise 403: Arrow/Flash, Avengers Academy, X-23, and Wolverine

Host Derek Coward talks about the concluding night of the TV crossover of Arrow and The Flash, a few issues of Avengers Academy, makes a music recommendation, talks about X-23,Wolverine and his lack of origin story, before talking a bit about origin stories themselves.

Comic Book Noise 359: Dog Days of Podcasting: Favorite Comic Book Character

Host Derek Coward returns to answer the seemingly simple question “What is your favorite comic book character?”, but nothing is ever that simple.

Reasons to dislike Steve Rogers: All New X-Men 12

The setup: Havok, the “leader” of the Uncanny Avengers, is meeting the Young Scott Summers from the past. At this time in his life, Scott doesn’t know much about his brother Alex beyond the fact that he has been adopted by a nice family.

Steve Rogers and the Avengers had gotten their asses handed to them in Australia, so he drags the Uncanny Avenger team to hijack the X-Men plane so that Alex can talk to Scott.  Remember that these two are virtually strangers to one another, but when has not thinking things through ever stopped Steve Rogers.

When the two meet face to face and Scott realizes who he’s talking with, Rogers says this:

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What a fucking douchebag! Even Thor and Scarlet Witch had to tell him to chill the fuck out, it’s brother stuff. Think about that for a second, the brother of Loki and the sister of Quicksilver have to tell somebody to shut up and let siblings talk. And they have tried to beat the hell out of their brothers before.

Then, when young Jean Grey reads the mind of Scarlet Witch and finds out about the MILLIONS of mutants she killed, she goes all Jean Grey on her ass. The situation is defused, but what does Rogers say then…

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He is actively protecting the murderer of millions and just shrugs it off with “none of that matters right now”.

After making what he has to know are baseless accusations against the younger version of the guy who kicked his ass more than once and his friends, Rogers sends them on their way, then says this:

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Havok just responds with “Yeah” but without any further context or word balloons. Personally, I like to think Alex was saying “Yeah” but thinking “Yeah, you would say that but this is the same guy that kicked your sorry ass so I’m pretty sure he had better days than today.  Asshole.”

Madelyne Pryor

As most listeners of Comic Book Noise know, Cyclops is my favorite member of the X-Men and one of my favorite comic book characters. That said, I always preferred Madelyne Pryor-Summers, his wife, to his old girlfriend, Jean Grey, and it bummed me out when he ran out on Maddie and the baby.
Punching-Scott

Tom Brevoort answered a question about Maddie on Formspring by saying “I don’t really know much about the inter-office politics of the era, but I do think that Madeline Pryor was a train wreck from beginning to end, from her first appearance to her latest.” While appreciate his frank answer, he is wrong about two major things: 1) It’s Madelyne, not Madeline, and 2) She didn’t start about as a train wreck, she was made that way.

According to Chris Claremont, there was not only a different fate in store for Maddie, but also for Scott and eventually, the rest of the X-Men.

“The original Madelyne storyline was that, at its simplest level, she was that one in a million shot that just happened to look like Jean Grey, [a.k.a. the first Phoenix]! And the relationship was summed up by the moment when Scott says: “Are you Jean?” And she punches him! That was in Uncanny X-Men #174. Because her whole desire was to be deeply loved for herself not to be loved as the evocation of her boyfriend’s dead romantic lover and sweetheart.

I mean, it’s a classical theme. You can go back to a whole host of 1930s films, 1940s, Hitchcock films—but it all got invalidated by the resurrection of Jean Grey in X-Factor #1. The original plotline was that Scott marries Madelyne, they have their child, they go off to Alaska, he goes to work for his grandparents, he retires from the X-Men. He’s a reserve member. He’s available for emergencies. He comes back on special occasions, for special fights, but he has a life. He has grown up. He has grown out of the monastery; he is in the real world now. He has a child. He has maybe more than one child. It’s a metaphor for us all. We all grow up. We all move on.

Scott was going to move on. Jean was dead get on with your life. And it was close to be a happy ending. They lived happily ever after, and it was to create the impression that maybe if you came back in ten years, other X-Men would have grown up and out, too. Would Kitty stay with the team forever? Would Nightcrawler? Would any of them? Because that way we could evolve them into new directions, we could bring in new characters. There would be an ongoing sense of renewal, and growth and change in a positive sense.

Then, unfortunately, Jean was resurrected, Scott dumps his wife and kid and goes back to the old girlfriend. So it not only destroys Scott’s character as a hero and as a decent human being it creates an untenable structural situation: what do we do with Madelyne and the kid? … So ultimately the resolution was: turn her into the Goblin Queen and kill her off.”

Can you imagine if Marvel had actually let their characters grow older and be replaced by different characters? Of course, it couldn’t happen, so they had to get rid of the reason why Scott Summers would even believe he grow up and be an adult. Remember that at the time, whatever affected the X-men affected the rest of the Marvel Universe. If they grew older, then so would The Avengers, The Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, etc. I wish I knew about the inter-office politics then, because 1983 seems like a good time to try and change how comic book storytelling would proceed. But what do I know…?

BTW: I also prefer Emma Frost and I hope she and Scott reconcile.
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Comic Book Noise 282: AvX Consequences

Host Derek Coward talks about AvX: Consequences at length, and mentions a few Marvel Now! titles.

avx-con2

Comic Book Noise 279: Why I Despise Captain America

Host Derek Coward talks about Avengers vs X-Men #12 and why it reignited his dislike for the comic book version of Captain America. This episode contains a lot more potentially offensive language than usual, so please take that into consideration before listening to it.

Comic Book Noise 250: Top Five Favorite X-Men Villains

Host Derek Coward talks about the history of some of the Comic Book Noise family shows, then goes over his top five favorite X-Men villains.

Comic Book Noise 228: X-Men Second Coming

Host Derek Coward takes a look at X-Men Second Coming.

Review of Girl Comics 1

Like a lot of people, I’m not that fond of the name, but since I don’t judge a book by its cover (Unless the cover says “Anybody Who Buys This Is A Pedophile And An Asshole”, then I would probably think twice about picking it up), I picked it up off the shelf.

It is an anthology, so it was up and down in terms of my likes and dislikes, but overall I liked it:

I liked the intro by Colleen Coover.

I didn’t like ‘Moritat’ by G. Willow Wilson/Ming Doyle/Cris Peter/Kathleen Marinaccio, but that’s because I don’t like comic book stories that heavily utilize musical performances. The artwork was very Paul Pope-ish, though.

I liked the Venus story by Trina Robbins/Stephanie Buscema/Kristyn Ferretti because I think stories about people from the past fitting into current times are usually funny.

I liked the spotlight on Flo Steinberg, who I remembered from What If #11, but had no idea who she really was.

I liked ‘A Brief Rendezvous’ by Valerie d’Orazio/Nikki Cook/Elizabeth Breitweiser/Kristyn Ferretti because it is always nice to see what The Punisher does with his off time.

I didn’t like the She-Hulk pin-up by Sana Takeda because her hand-foot was distracting and I think if a male artist had drawn this particular picture he would have been raked over the coals for it.

I liked ‘Shop Doc’ by Lucy Knisley, I thought it was cute.

I liked the spotlight on Marie Severin. She’s Marie Severin, who wouldn’t?

I skipped over ‘Clockwork Nightmare’ by Robin Furth/Agnes Garbowska/Kristyn Ferretti for the same reason I didn’t like ‘Moritat’, only instead of a musical performance, this seemed like it was poetry.

I liked ‘Head Space’ by Devin Grayson/Emma Rios/Barbara Ciardo/Kathleen Marinaccio. I have always thought she spent too much time exploring relationships between characters rather than the characters themselves and as a result, I haven’t been a big fan of her work. She does the same thing in this story, but it makes sense since it was a story about a relationship. Of course, she makes my favorite X-Man look like a little bitch, but then again, almost all writers make him look like a little bitch.

I know a lot of people will pass on this book because of the “high price tag” and I’m not sure what kind of business it will do in trade, but I don’t feel like I got ripped off and I’m looking forward to the other two issues in the miniseries.

Also, I love the cover by Amanda Conner and Laura Martin.

[ratings]

February 2009 Poll Results

There was a problem with this poll where it wasn’t appearing on the site for an unknown amount of time. As a result, the amount of votes were lower than normal.

Who is your favorite member of the original X-Men?
Cyclops 43%
Angel 21%
Iceman 21%
Beast 14%
Marvel Girl 0%